Summer Courses

Summer Classes In Linguistics

Why Attend Linguistics Courses This Summer?
  • To fulfill your interest in the field of linguistics
  • To help you graduate sooner
  • To get a head start on General Education requirements
  • To complete your prep. courses so you can take upper division Linguistics classes sooner
  • To start working on your requirements for the Linguistics major(s)
  • To take advantage of summer’s smaller classes and relaxed atmosphere
  • To change academic or geographic environment
  • To see what it’s like to take a class at UCLA
What Is Linguistics?

Linguistics is the systematic study of human language in general. Linguists try to understand how languages are put together, how they are alike and how they differ from one another, how they change and how people learn and use them.

What Courses Are Offered?

See below for the list of Summer 2017 courses. You can find the course schedule times by visiting this page at the UCLA Registrar site:
Linguistics courses

We also offer a course in intensive American Sign Language:
Intensive American Sign Language courses

For brief descriptions of the courses, visit the UCLA online Course Catalog for:

Frequently Asked Questions:

How do I enroll?

For more information (how to enroll, cost/fees, etc.), visit the Summer Sessions website.
Summer sessions office and email:
1331 Murphy Hall
Tel: (310) 825-4101
E-Mail: info@summer.ucla.edu
For general questions about Linguistics, please contact the Undergraduate Student Affairs Officer.

Do I have to be a UCLA STUDENT TO TAKE SUMMER CLASSES?
No. However, you will need to register as a summer student to attend and attain credit.
How many courses can I take in Summer?
Students can register for up to 18 units in summer sessions. We strongly recommend only two courses per session. However, if you need to take more units, you can request a unit limit increase via the UCLA Summer Sessions Office.
How long are Linguistics Summer courses?
Linguistics courses are 6 weeks long in Summer, with the exception of Linguistics 103 which is an 8 week course.
Can I take courses with time conflicts?
Students are able to register for courses with time conflicts. However, students are required to attend lecture and discussions for all classes. Therefore if there is a time conflict, consider contacting the instructors first to ask if leaving class early would be allowed. Otherwise, you may need change your course schedule and contact the Undergraduate Student Affairs Officer for guidance with course planning.

Summer 2017

Linguistics 1: Introduction to Study of Language (Online – Session A)

Instructor: Chiara Bozzone

Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Summary, for general undergraduates, of what is known about human language; unique nature of human language, its structure, its universality, and its diversity; language in its social and cultural setting; language in relation to other aspects of human inquiry and knowledge. P/NP or letter grading.

Linguistics 1: Introduction to Study of Language (Session C)

Instructor: Eleanor Glewwe

Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Summary, for general undergraduates, of what is known about human language; unique nature of human language, its structure, its universality, and its diversity; language in its social and cultural setting; language in relation to other aspects of human inquiry and knowledge. P/NP or letter grading.

Linguistics 103: General Phonetics (Session A)

Instructor: Meng Yang

Lecture, four hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Enforced requisite: course 20 with grade of B- or better. Not open for credit to students with credit for course 102. Phonetics of variety of languages and phonetic phenomena that occur in languages of world. Extensive practice in perception and production of such phenomena. P/NP or letter grading.

Linguistics 105: Morphology (Session A)

Instructor: Daniela Culinovic

Lecture, four hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Enforced requisite: course 20. In linguistics, morphology is study of word structure. Morphological theory seeks to answer questions such as how should words and their component parts (roots, prefixes, suffixes, vowel changes) be classified crosslinguistically? how do speakers store, produce, and process complex words (words with affixes, compounds)? how do speakers know how to produce correct word forms even when they have not previously heard them and how do speakers know that particular words are well-formed or ill-formed? is there principled distinction in traditional division between inflection and derivation? how can we best account for variation in forms that are same (e.g., root in keep/kept even though vowels are different)? can we formulate crosslinguistic generalizations about word structure? P/NP or letter grading.

Linguistics 120A: Phonology I (Session A)

Instructor: Adam Royer

Lecture, four hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Requisites: courses 20, 103. Introduction to phonological theory and analysis. Rules, representations, underlying forms, derivations. Justification of phonological analyses. Emphasis on practical skills with problem sets. P/NP or letter grading.

Linguistics 120A: Phonology I (Session C)

Instructor: Brice Roberts

Lecture, four hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Requisites: courses 20, 103. Introduction to phonological theory and analysis. Rules, representations, underlying forms, derivations. Justification of phonological analyses. Emphasis on practical skills with problem sets. P/NP or letter grading.

Linguistics 120B: Syntax I (Session A)

Instructor: Nicoletta Loccioni

Lecture, four hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Requisite: course 20 with grade of B- or better. Course 120A is not requisite to 120B. Descriptive analysis of morphological and syntactic structures in natural languages; emphasis on insight into nature of such structures rather than linguistics formalization. P/NP or letter grading.

Linguistics 120B: Syntax I (Session C)

Instructor: Sozen Ozkan

Lecture, four hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Requisite: course 20 with grade of B- or better. Course 120A is not requisite to 120B. Descriptive analysis of morphological and syntactic structures in natural languages; emphasis on insight into nature of such structures rather than linguistics formalization. P/NP or letter grading.

Linguistics 120C: Semantics I (Session C)

Instructor: Maayan Abenina-Adar

Lecture, four hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Requisite: course 120B. Survey of most important theoretical and descriptive claims about nature of meaning. P/NP or letter grading.

Linguistics 130: Language Development (Session A)

Instructor: Victoria Mateu Martin

Lecture, four hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Requisites: courses 20, 119A or 120A, 119B or 120B. Survey of research and theoretical perspectives in language development in children. Discussion and examination of child language data from English and other languages. Emphasis on universals of language development. Topics include infant speech perception and production, development of phonology, morphology, syntax, and word meaning. P/NP or letter grading.

Linguistics 160: Field Methods (Session A)

Instructor: Margit Bowler and Travis Major

Lecture, four hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Requisites: courses 102 or 103, 119A or 120A, 119B or 120B. Analysis of language unknown to members of class from data elicited from native speaker of that language. P/NP or letter grading.

Linguistics 20: Introduction to Linguistic Analysis (Session A)

Instructor: John Gluckman

Lecture, four hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Introduction to theory and methods of linguistics: universal properties of human language; phonetic, phonological, morphological, syntactic, and semantic structures and analysis; nature and form of grammar. P/NP or letter grading.

Linguistics 20: Introduction to Linguistic Analysis (Session C)

Instructor: Iara Mantenuto

Lecture, four hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Introduction to theory and methods of linguistics: universal properties of human language; phonetic, phonological, morphological, syntactic, and semantic structures and analysis; nature and form of grammar. P/NP or letter grading.