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April 2021

Colloquium with Nikos Angelopoulos (Grad Colloquium)

April 16 @ 11:00 am - 1:00 pm
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Colloquium with Kristen Syrett (Rutgers)

April 9 @ 11:00 am - 1:00 pm

Zoom link: https://ucla.zoom.us/j/98929850267?pwd=Y3hUdi9RSG5ITG9UT0ZGRUFReU5hdz09 Meeting ID: 989 2985 0267  Passcode: colloquium  Abstract: Making comparisons and interpreting comparatives in child language  Rutgers University – New Brunswick For many years now, researchers in language and cognitive development have been plagued by children’s divergent non-adult-like productions of comparative constructions, and their apparent inability to properly interpret even the most basic of comparatives (although researchers have also thrown some complicated ones their way!). The source of the difficulty has been alternatively attributed to a lack of understanding…

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February 2021

Colloquium Talk with Jeremy Steffman

February 19 @ 11:00 am - 12:00 pm

Prosodic context in speech perception When listeners process spoken language, they extract information about (1) segmental categories, defining the words intended by a speaker and (2) prosodic features, which convey information about prominence, grouping, and so on (i.e. how the words are said). These two parts of understanding spoken language are often studied as separate, however, their joint influence in structuring acoustic information in the speech signal suggests that they might interact in perception. This talk presents an exploration of one sort…

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January 2021

Colloquium Talk with Molly Babel

January 29 @ 11:00 am - 1:00 pm

Molly Babel (UBC). Faculty host: Claire Moore-Cantwell. Zoom link: https://ucla.zoom.us/j/99599993759?pwd=NkQwQnRwNkpqWGRMTGV1dG1FbUxyUT09   Email the Colloquium Committee at uclacolloquium@gmail.com to be added to the listserv. For guest outside of UCLA, please submit an RSVP for colloquiums you would like to attend. Abstract: When do listeners care about phonetic variation? Spoken language is immenselyvariable. Some of that variation may be associated with social categories andsome may be idiosyncratic to an individual’s voice. Either of these sources ofvariation may affect the typical patterning of meaningful contrasts…

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November 2020

Colloquium Talk with Jessica Coon

November 20, 2020 @ 11:00 am - 1:00 pm

Jessica Coon (McGill University). Faculty host: Harold Torrence. Zoom link will be available one week before the talk. Email the Colloquium Committee at uclacolloquium@gmail.com to be added to the listserv. For guest outside of UCLA, please submit an RSVP for colloquiums you would like to attend.

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October 2020

Colloquium Talk with Gillian Gallagher

October 30, 2020 @ 11:00 am - 1:00 pm

Phonetic variability and natural class phonotacticsGillian Gallagher, NYU Phonological patterns are stated over classes of sounds, usually defined based on a shared phonetic property. Phonetic sound changes and phonetic variation, however, are both extremely common, and easily result in a language showing a phonological pattern over a class of segments that cannot be easily defined given the synchronic phonetic system. In this talk, I look at such a case in South Bolivian Quechua, where the etymological plain uvular stop /q/ has…

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Colloquium Talk with Hannah Sande

October 23, 2020 @ 11:00 am - 1:00 pm

Hannah Sande (Georgetown University). Faculty host: Ethan Poole Zoom link will be available one week ahead of the talk.

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Colloquium Talk with Joe Pater

October 9, 2020 @ 11:00 am - 1:00 pm

Joe Pater (UMass). Faculty host: Claire Moore-Cantwell Zoom link will be available one week ahead of the talk.

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December 2019

Colloquium: Nathan Klinedinst – Anaphora and Identity

December 6, 2019 @ 11:00 am - 1:00 pm

In prominent theories pronouns are treated as having (in effect) descriptive content, to explain the possibility of anaphora on indefinites outside their binding domain. We discuss some data that appears to be problematic for these approaches, and consider as an alternative, a view that treats pronouns as simple variables and tracks anaphoric dependencies separately.

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November 2019

Colloquium: Will Styler – Using Transparent Machine Learning to study Human Speech

November 15, 2019 @ 11:00 am - 1:00 pm

Using Transparent Machine Learning to study Human Speech   Machine learning, the use of nuanced computer models to analyze and predict data, has a long history in speech recognition and natural language processing, but has largely been limited to more applied, engineering tasks.  This talk will describe two more research-focused applications of transparent machine learning algorithms in the study of speech perception and production. For speech perception, we’ll examine the difficult problem of identifying acoustic cues to a complex phonetic…

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